October 23

Tags

Syrian Refugee camp in Jordan

 

Japanese follows

Today’s theme is “To be honest, I was an ignorant. What did I realize in a Syrian refugee camp?”.

Could you imagine that you have to keep living in this refugee camp for years and years?

Could you imagine that you may not be able to go back your hometown?

P1150535

I have never lived and studied abroad, in other words, I have never lived in anywhere but Japan. It is common for me to live in a house with a bath, toilet and roof, of course drinking tap water is totally safe in Japan. So, it was very hard for me to imagine their life of the refugee camp, even though the real camp view was spread in front of me.

I don’t know why but I was on the brink of tears when I only walked into the refugee camp on the first day of camp. I remember the scene which I was fighting back tears because I didn’t want to cry there.

So what’s with my waterworks? Sadness? Pain? Compassion? Pity? Helpless? Quite frankly, I have absolutely no idea and cannot express my feelings correctly. I want to burn these emotions which I haven’t sorted out into my memory.

The one of reasons why I cannot understand my feelings by myself is there are too many differences compared with my experience to understand anymore. I’ve lost me.

  • For example, we have to show police my ID permission card whenever we entered in the camp.
  • Iron wire surround on the wall around camp.
  • We were checked whether bomb was set or not.
  • Refugees can buy foods using Iris recognition at a supermarket

 

The Za’atari Refugee Camp, established on July 29, 2012, has an area of 5.3 km2 (which is equivalent to an area roughly 112 times that of Tokyo Dome) and accommodates 12 districts.

The Refugee Camp, sheltering about 80,000 refugees, is the world’s fifth largest refugee camp and accommodates the largest number of Syrian refugees in the world. *

(I was shocked by existing a larger refugee camp than it …)

According to UNHCR, Refugees of the Syrian Civil War is as below. Jordan is the third largest host country of registered refugees with over 600,000 Syrian refugees.

This population is shown refugees who had been registered, so this figure is likely underestimated. * UNHCR website

Total population 5.3 milllion
Regions with important populations (Registered)
 Turkey  3.2 million
 Lebanon 1 million
Jordan  660,000

The population of Shimane-ken in Japan is as well as Jordan registered refugees.

As embarrassing as this is to say, I didn’t know the problems of refugees around the world. Regardless the amounts of refugees who aim to European countries had increased since 2015, I couldn’t catch up the problems in my daily life. I’m preoccupied with the next milestone and my full mailbox, so that I didn’t turn my attention to what happens in the world now while some media reported IS terrorists etc.

In the first day, I feel “Is it real that many refugees, who escaped from war to reach Jordan, have to live in front of me?”. Of course I grasped what is Syrian War. However, I wanted to put the reality in a box and observe from the far place for keeping self-consciousness. I was really shocked the reality view. If I did not, my feelings would overflow from myself.

As I was, we Japanese can live if you don’t know the events of the other countries. I think they would rather live not facing to that than have feel helpless and terrible for some reasons. You can’t just sweep your problems under the carpet? Ignorance is bliss.? (Strictly speaking, these are incorrect to express the above situation.)

I wonder if it really happens in “the other country” and have nothing to do you?

My answer is No. This is what I who are ignore realize in a Syrian refugee camp.

See you next blog! – Next Theme: What is vulnerability?

==========================================================

今日のテーマは、“無知な日本人の私がシリア難民キャンプで最初に感じたこと”です。

想像できますか?

この難民キャンプで、何年も何年も暮らし続ける生活を。

自分の生まれ育った故郷に帰りたくても帰れないかもしれない状況を。

 

私は留学もしていなければ、海外在住経験もないので日本以外の国に住んだことがありませんでした。

生まれたときから当たり前のように風呂・トイレ・屋根付きの家に暮らし、蛇口をひねれば安全な水を飲むことができた私にとって、現場に立っていてもここでの生活を想像することは非常に困難でした。

初日、難民キャンプ内を歩いているだけで、なぜが涙がこみあげてきそうになりました。質問をしたりしながら、必死に涙がこぼれないようにしていたのが鮮明に思い出されます。自分の涙の意味は、悲哀?切なさ?憐み?同情?無力さ?….誤解を恐れずに回答すると、どんな感情だったのか分かりませんし、今でも正確に答えることはできません。ただ、自分の感情が整理できなかったという正直な感情を忘れないでいようと思いました。

こんなにも自分の感情が整理できなかった理由のひとつは、おそらく多くのことが違いすぎて自分が今まで生きてきた経験や感覚では理解できないことだらけだったからだと思いました。

難民キャンプに入る際には、毎回PoliceからID許可証(難民キャンプ入場専用のIDを作成する必要があります)の提示を求められます。

キャンプの周りの壁上面には、鉄のワイヤーが張り巡らされています。

P1150519

毎日、車に爆弾を設置していないか検査されます。

電気と水は制限されています。

NGOから支給されたお金で食べ物を買うための虹彩認証がスーパーに備わっています。

P1150531

私が今いるザータリ難民キャンプは、2012年7月29日に開設され、今ではキャンプ内の難民数は約80,000人にも及びます。5.3k㎡(東京ドーム約112個分)の広さに、12もの地区があります。ヨルダン北部の砂漠に位置する世界最大のシリア難民キャンプで、世界でみても5番目に大きな難民キャンプです。*

(これより大きな難民キャンプが世界には存在するということも衝撃ですが…)

シリア難民のトータルは530万人といわれており、トルコ(320万人)、レバノン(100万人)に続き、ヨルダンは66万人を受け入れています。あくまでもUNHCRによる登録難民の数ですので、非登録難民の数を考慮するともう少し増えるでしょう。*UNHCR Website参照

66万人は、東京でいうと足立区の人口、県でいうと島根県の人口と同じくらいです。北海道より少し大きいくらいの面積の国に、一気に島根県の人全員が移住してきているようなイメージです。

恥ずかしながら、私は難民問題について全く知りませんでした。2015年からヨーロッパを目指す難民が激増していたにも関わらず、朝のNEWS番組を少し流す程度しかしない私の普段の生活では難民のNEWSはほとんど入ってきていませんでした。ISのテロニュースが報道されていたときも、次のマイルストンやメールボックスを埋める大量のメールを読むことで頭がいっぱいで今私たちが生きている地球で何が起きているかに目を向けていませんでした。

初日の訪問では、紛争で逃げてきた人が本当にこの世界にいるんだというような感覚でした。もちろんJENで働き始めて3か月が経過しており、シリア紛争の現況は把握していました。しかし、その状況が目の前に広がっていることが衝撃的過ぎて、現実にふたをして箱に閉じ込め、遠くからその箱を観察しておくことで、自我を保っていました。

かつての私がそうであったように、違う国で起きていることを知らなくても日本で生きていくことはできます。現実を知ったところで何もできない自分の無力さや、説明しようのない恐怖を感じるくらいなら、向き合わずに知ろうとせずに生きていくのが、楽な生き方なのだと思います。 “臭いものには蓋をする”“知らぬが仏”といったところでしょうか? (正確にいえば、どちらの諺も状況にはマッチしていませんが…)

ただ果たして、本当に『知らない国』で起きていることなのでしょうか?本当に自分とは『無関係』なのでしょうか?

私は「違う」と思いました。これが“無知な日本人の私がシリア難民キャンプで最初に感じたこと”です。

次回また、続きを書きたいと思います。(テーマ:脆弱性とはなにか?)